The Man Who Ate the World: In Search of the Perfect Dinner

April 22, 2016 - Comment

“A hilarious and insightful journey into the world of restaurant meals.”―Mario Batali “Nobody goes to restaurants for nutritional reasons. They go for the experience. And what price a really top experience?” What price indeed? Fearlessly, and with great wit and verve, award-winning restaurant critic Jay Rayner goes in search of the perfect meal. From the

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“A hilarious and insightful journey into the world of restaurant meals.”―Mario Batali

“Nobody goes to restaurants for nutritional reasons. They go for the experience. And what price a really top experience?”

What price indeed? Fearlessly, and with great wit and verve, award-winning restaurant critic Jay Rayner goes in search of the perfect meal. From the Tokyo sushi chef who offers a toast of snake-infused liquor to close a spectacular meal, to Joël Robuchon in Las Vegas where Robuchon himself eagerly watches his guest’s every mouthful, to seven three-star Michelin restaurants in seven days in Paris, Rayner conducts a whirlwind tour of high-end gastronomy that will thrill the heart―and stomach―of any armchair gourmand. Along the way, he uses his entrée into the restaurant world to probe the larger issues behind the globalization of dinner.

Riotously funny and shrewdly observed, The Man Who Ate the World is a fascinating look at the business and pleasure of fine dining.

Comments

Genene Murphy says:

Hide your credit cards. Then read this book. While reading this book, avoid Expedia and Orbitz or any deep-seated desires to taste Toyko or tour New York City. Stay far, far away from wine auctions and think twice about booking reservations at restaurants that issue fraud alerts. Because after reading Rayner’s adventures and quest for the perfect meal, you’ll want to spend a lot of money for your next travel/foodie fix. 

Valerie Usowski says:

When at Katz’s Deli get the tongue I was so pysched when I read the ‘Warning’ (urging the reader to get a snack beforehand or suffer through hunger pains)that I actually grabbed a banana and settled into my couch for a long read. I happily read the first chapter about having a ‘proper dinner’ and wondered where in Upstate NY I could actually get a decent app of escargot. Still intrigued I read on. Las Vegas. Really? I know, a blossoming culinary mecca. The only things blossoming there are the busoms of the waitresses. I…

C. J. Thompson says:

Thoroughly enjoyable Jay Rayner, I have to say, strikes one as a very unlikely sort of food critic. In the photograph on the cover of my copy of his book, he has a distinctly ‘mad-monk’ sort of appearance that is almost a bit scary. One might, on seeing him in a restaurant, for example, take him for a professional wrestler on a night off, rather than the respected food writer he actually is. 

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